Artist – Paul Klee

KN the Blacksmith.Paul Klee .1879-1940

Klee was an important German/Swiss artist who was highly influenced by expressionism,cubism,surrealism and orientalism. Although his work appears very abstract his process was all about studying reality, his was just another ‘method of studying nature’. Sara Fanelli is one modern artist who has been highly influenced by his work and they both have a grasp of the absurd.

“Georg Schmidt has described him as “the most realistic painter of the twentieth century”

Paul Klee art work creates a world that tries to make sense of reality to the point where a philosopher might label him absurd – as it is surely absurd to try and things make sense.

‘Certain philosophers maintain that Klee’s work is poetical but absurd – as it would be did the srtist not succeed in convincing us of its existence. If he failed to do so it would not even be poetic. Klee’s paintings reveal an area of intuitive knowledgewhere the absurd has its own rigorous logic and therefore ceases to be absurd’

The Twittering Machine. 1922. Paul Klee.

Klee used humour in his artwork and with the titles of his paintings. He made images that were dreamlike, poetical and musical.

‘When faced with the exceptional richness of Klee’s imagerie one might perhaps say that it is in fact a reflection of the cosmic fervour of his thought. But there is something else there – that humour which we rarely find in his theoretical writings. there is humour even in the gloomy pictures of his last days. The still life, which was the last of his works, is by way of being the triumph of humour over the preceeding paintings.’

Klee taught at the Bauhaus with his compatriot  Wassily Kandinski who is credited with painting the first purely abstract works. Both studied colour and its application through intense thought and practice.

 

Quotes from G.Di San Lazarro’s Klee;a study of his life and work. Thames and Hudson.1957

See also Klee:text by Marcel Mornat. Leon Amiel Publisher.NY 1974.

 

 

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